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Hiking on Cedar Sink Trail

by Kelly A. McCauley on August 25, 2013

After breakfast, Jory wanted to go hike somewhere. We thought for a little bit, bounced around some ideas and then my wife (now ex-wife) convinced us to try for something in Mammoth Cave National Park. I pulled out the park’s map and spotted Cedar Sink trail. It was a short drive away. My son and I hopped into our van and headed out. Thirty minutes later, we were there. The trail head was well marked and had plenty of parking.

The trail head
Jory getting a head start at the beginning of the trail.
Photograph by Kelly McCauley.

The trail was covered in tiny chipped gravel, the kind that always somehow finds its way into your shoe and under your heel. The air was much cooler under the trees and the bugs were not too pesky. There were plenty of summer wildflowers along the trail.

Black eyed susans (flowers)
Black eyed susans.
Photograph by Kelly McCauley.
Wildflowers on moss.
Photograph by Kelly McCauley.

The trail meandered up and over some small hills. We moseyed along. Jory pretended to be a super spy and we were stalking the bad guys. He disarmed the traps and warned me where not to step.

Meandering trail.
Photograph by Kelly McCauley.

We joined up with an old road bed. The ground dropped off on the other side of the road bed. The tree tops were at eye level. The trail took us over the edge of the ledge and with the help of a well placed set of metal steps, we managed to scramble to the bottom.

Jory standing at the top of the stairs.
Jory standing at the top of the stairs.
Photograph by Kelly McCauley.
Small rock bluffs.
Photograph by Kelly McCauley.

We saw a couple of small rock bluffs as we made our way down.

The descending stairs.
Photograph by Kelly McCauley.

Down and down we went, to the left and right of us the bad guys fell to their doom. Finally we reached the bottom. Two sinks were at the bottom. We took a look at the right hand sink first.

The right hand sink.
Photograph by Kelly McCauley.
A picture of the water that flows into the sink.
Photograph by Kelly McCauley.

The sink is part of the Hawkins-Logsdon underground river system. The water briefly appears at the surface and then descends back underground where it will eventually flow into the Green River at Turn Hole bend.

Next, we turned our attention to the left hand sink. The sink was a giant muddy hole. Not a safe place to go wandering off of the trail (which isn’t permitted anyway).

The left hand sink.
Photograph by Kelly McCauley.

The trail went on, but Jory and I turned around to head back. A six year old only has so much energy and I didn’t want the last part of the trail to end up in a fussy struggle.

Jory and I battled more imaginary bad guys on the way back up the stairs. We talked about past bad guy encounters from previous hikes as we walked back to the van. We had a good time and was time well spent with my son.

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